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History Day 2017

Fusenot Foundation and SDCEE Economics History Day Awards

The San Diego Center for Economics Education continues its support of History Day through the recognition of economics themes in students projects. The following students were given awards for their outstanding work. See below for images and descriptions of each project.

  • From Selma to Saigon Documentary Students Accepting Award (Picture 2) 2.26.17
  • From Selma to Saigon Documentary with Students 2.25.17
  • Milton Friedman Exhibit with Student 2.25.17
  • Milton Friedman Exhibit with Student Accepting Award (Picture 3) 2.26.17
  • Sit-In to Stand Up Exhibit Students Accepting Award (Picture 2) 2.26.17
  • Sit-In to Stand Up Exhibit Students Accepting Award (Picture 3) 2.26.17
  • Sit-In to Stand Up Exhibit with Students 2.25.17
  • The Congo Reform Association Website with Students (Picture 1) 2.25.17
  • The Congo Reform Association Website with Students Accepting Award (Picture 3) 2.26.17

“Sit-In to Stand-Up: A Victory for 504”
Ian Lillie and Addy Phillips

$100 Award
Ian and Addy did a great job identifying how cost/benefit analysis can be used to evaluate government policies. When asked about the costs associated with implementing federal section 504, they did a good job identifying both private business and societal costs associated with improving access for disabled people. Against these costs they balanced the financial and societal benefits of integrating disabled people into our workforce and concluded that the benefits exceeded the costs.

“From Selma to Saigon: The Civil Rights Movement’s Shifting Stand on the Vietnam War”
Eleanor Hansen and Amanda Wasserman
$100 Award
Historical context dominated the economics, but both students elaborated well on multiple economic concepts including opportunity cost of war, political expediency, diminishing benefits of war and the micro ramifications of war on particular demographics, namely African-American people, in America.  Overall, both students did a stellar job and offered knowledge in extracting economic principles from this historical event.

“The Congo Reform Association: History’s First Humanitarian Movement”
Elias Jinich, Neusha Kharrati, Gabriel Jinich and Avi Waldman
$100 Award
This senior group website that very articulately demonstrated a solid comprehension of economic concepts related to their project.  They understood per capita income, opportunity costs, mercantilism, economic growth, the relationship between a political system and economic conditions.  The students were able to extrapolate from history to our modern era, drawing important connections to better evaluate government policy and its implications.  The most insightful point was how the Congo economy has minimally progressed to this day anchored by its past.

“Milton Friedman: Using Media to Influence the Politics Fueling Both Capitalism and Freedom”
James Cockerman
$150 Award
Our grand prize of $150 goes to an individual junior exhibit that did an utterly amazing job capturing the influence Milton Friedman had on Reaganomics.  James articulated economic concepts and vocabulary, like money supply, monetarism, incentives, the Federal Reserve and inflation, to name a few) throughout his presentation.  He did a great job connecting to the History Day theme discussing how Friedman used his prolific book writing, the radio, TV and newspapers to get his message out.

History Day 2016 Economics Winners

The San Diego Center for Economics Education continues its support of History Day through the recognition of economics themes in students projects. The following students were given awards for their outstanding work.

History Day 2015

The San Diego Center for Economics Education continues its support of History Day through the recognition of economics themes in students projects. The following students were given awards for their outstanding work.

Junior Individual Website
George Fratian, Mesa Verde Middle School,
Project: “Hitler’s Left-hand General: Erwin Rommel”
Prize: $50

Junior Group Exhibit
Alexis Dominguez and Gabrielle Magers.  Oak Grove Middle School
Project: “George Washington: A Legacy of War, Presidency & Prosperity’
Prize: $50

Junior Group Documentary
Eleanor Hansen, Amanda Wasserman, Anika Heidt and Cleo Chaplin. Francis Parker School
Project: “Dual Visions of a Revolution: Fidel Castro, Che Guevara, and the Leadership of the Cuban Revolution”
Prize: $100

Senior Group Exhibit
Olivia Ghosh, Pedro Gallardo, Soren Hansen, Robert Brownlie and Zach Bernstein. Francis Parker School,
Project: “Ho Chi Minh”
Prize: $250

History Day 2014

The San Diego Center for Economics Education continues its support of History Day through the recognition of economics themes in students projects. The following students were given awards for their outstanding work.

History Day 2013 Econ Winners

Congratulations to the SDCEE Economics Award winners for 2013:

1 – $250 Senior Exhibit Award goes to Soren Hansen and Olivia Ghosh from Francis Parker for their “Fall of the Berlin Wall” exhibit.

2 – $150 Junior Exhibit Award goes to Taylor Hicks from Oak Grove Middle School for her “Disney: Animation of the Century” exhibit.

3 – $50 2-D Display Award goes to Janani Sundarram from Vista Grande Elementary School for her “The Gold Rush: A Turning Point in U.S. History” poster.

2011 History Day – Senior Exhibit Winner

Emily Bohl

Senior Exhibit

11th Grade

Francis Parker High School

C. Redelings

Between the Rock and a Hard Place: the American Indian Occupation of Alcatraz

Project Economic Connections:

When Alcatraz lost its title as a high-security prison stranded in the San Francisco Bay, the US government found it very hard to use the excess land effectively for government purposes.  Soon, the government was accepting proposals for what to do with “the Rock.”  One of the proposals for the island came from Lamar Hunt, a wealthy oil tycoon from Texas.  Hunt wanted to buy the island and create a development complete with a space monument for the West to rival the Statue of Liberty. The government began leaning towards Hunt’s proposal, recognizing his monetary ability to make the project happen and ignoring the Indian proposal to make Alcatraz an Indian cultural center, so the Indians had to take action, and in November 1969, they did.

2011 History Day – Junior Exhibit Winner

Pedro Gallardo, Mary Soren Hansen and Sarah Ogle

Junior Exhibit

8th Grade

Francis Parker Middle School

M. Ong-Dean

The Zimmerman Telegram; Diplomatic Note That Changed WW1

Project Economic Connections:

The Zimmerman Telegram pushed the United States into WW1. The United States spent approximately $33.5 billion on the war. Before the telegram was sent, the English Blockade prevented trade between the United States and any Central Powers. However, the blockade increased trade with the Allied Powers. Meanwhile, Germany was attacking American merchant ships and British merchant ships, such as the Lusitania. The war itself had a huge impact on the American economy. During the war, government agencies such as the Food Administration and the War Industries Board were created to cope with mobilizing the army and controlling the war economy, including rationing.

2011 History Day – 2D Display WInner

Brandon Moore

2-Dimensional Display (formerly “Posters”)

5th Grade

Tierrasanta Elementary School

J. Lench

The Stamp Act of 1765: The Act That Sparked a Revolution

Project Economic Connections:

From an economic standpoint, the Stamp Act of 1765 had no positive impact on Great Britain and it’s economy.  Instead, a negative effect occurred where little to no income was realized by Great Britain’s economy like King George III and the British Parliament had hoped. Rather, the Stamp Act took money OUT of Britain’s financial system.

Every choice has a cost, and it was the British Parliament’s choice to impose the Stamp Act on their American colonies in the year 1765. Instead of purchasing the tax stamps like Parliament had wanted, the colonists rejected the Act and boycotted all British goods.This had a negative effect on Great Britain’s economy because the colonists united and pledged not to purchase goods from British merchants. Instead of putting money into the British financial system, no money was put in at all because colonists refused to support the foreign traders

Instead of purchasing goods from foreign merchants (British), colonists decided to trade with other countries, smuggle goods in, and hand process items rather than buy things from British merchants. This was one of the many failures of the Stamp Act in Great Britain’s view.